Rolling out the Barrel in Real Results Circle trials

09.05.2018

David Fuller-Shapcott of Sweethope Farm, near Kelso, Scottish Borders

The KWS Barrel in my Real Results trial this year has come through the winter OK. It was under snow for about three weeks, with temperatures of -8 to -10OC ,which is not particularly colder than our average winter; however, there was more moisture because of the snow.

The crop is probably a week to 10 days behind where it would normally be at this time of year. I don’t suppose it will be a week to 10 days late to harvest,  I expect it will only be a day or two later; things usually concertina slightly across the whole growing season.

At the moment Septoria tritici is present but there is not much sign of anything else. I applied the T0 today (30 April 2018) using prochloraz + tebuconazole and chlorothalonil.

We’ve been using Adexar at T1 for a number of years now as the farm standard, so last year I went on using the farm standard in the Real Results plot and then put something else against it, round the outside, to see if we were actually still doing the right thing.

It turns out that we are, as the crop in the Real Results plot performed better than the crop round the outside. Our Real Results programme is Adexar followed by Adexar which is slightly unusual. We will be doing the same thing this year but with a different combination of products round the outside.

 

Lucy Milner, senior research technician, ADAS

ADAS is very much involved in the BASF Real Results Circle trials, not only helping to set them up but also through the use of an ADAS-led project called Agronõmics, which involves new digital techniques for farm-based research using precision farming technologies.

This helps growers design better trials as well as providing proper data analysis, to give growers more confidence in the results than they would ever have had before.

I have all the Scottish trials to set up; because High Mowthorpe is the most northerly site for ADAS I automatically get the Scottish trials to do. This year I set them all up in two days during the middle week of April.

Before I head out to the field I am given a rough trial plan, agreed with the farmer, ADAS and BASF which has on it where the tramlines are, so I have a rough idea of what to expect before I get into the field. The trial plan also includes the areas where the treatments are to be applied.

When I mark out a trial I put out canes on the tramlines for treated areas and take the co-ordinates of these individual tramlines. These co-ordinates go back to Susie Roques, ADAS Crop Physiologist, and the farmer involved.

I also take soil samples at this time.

The trials have to be set up before the T1 is applied at GS31. Thankfully, growth stages in Scotland are generally a bit behind those in England, so I have a little bit more breathing space.

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